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Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)
democrat, dick durbin. for analysis we'll bring in the "washington post's" david ignatius. tom ricks, august of can the gen. and our own bob orr and margaret brennan. and we'll have a farewell interview with maine's republican senator olympia snowe, who's leaving the senate because she no longer felt it was a place she could get anything done. it's been a wild week, but we'll try to put it in perspective on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again. we want to get right to the story in the middle east. , israel continuing to amass troops on the period with gaza. three israelis are dead, more than 50 wounded by rocket fire. the airstrikes go on. the question now, will the israelis send their ground troops into gaza? we're going first this morning to alan pizzey who is in tel aviv. allen. >> reporter: good morning, bob. overnight the israelis continued to pound positions in gaza. they've expand their operation away from just purely military targets into the hamas infrastructure.
both chambers. >> schieffer: if upcertainty over making a deal were not enough, washington was rocked by the scandal involving c.i.a. chief david petraeus. we'll get the latest on petraeus and the chances of compromise on the financial argument from republican senator lindsey graham. we'll get insight on the pretty thinking from his top strategist, david axelrod. then we'll go to our all-star panel of analysts. peggy noonan of the ""wall street journal"." david gergen of harvard university. dee dee myers of "vanity fair." and our own john dickerson. election 2012 is in the bookes, but the story is just beginning. and this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: good morning, again. on this veteran's day. and we begin with senator graham who is in clemson, south carolina. senator, thank you for coming. you are on the armed services committee, of course, so i want to start out with this out-of-the blue thunderbolt that hit washington friday concerning david petraeus the c.i.a. director. he resigne
seeing is that the republican establishment in washington and the establishments wherever they exist in the country, they took a shock. they are somewhat concussed. however, the base itself has been shocked and is somewhat concussed. and i think sometimes at moments of shock you can look at yourself and you can say there are ways i need change. so i actually consider this promising in some ways. it can move forward things in a good way. i think the tea party is going to have to look at itself. it's been so helpful to the republican party in the past. it saved it by not going third party in 2010, helping the republicans sweep the house. but the tea party style of rage is not one nawins over converts and makes-- that wins over converts and makes people lean towards them and say, "i want to listen to you." i think a friendly persuasion has to begin now from the republican party to people of the united states. >> schieffer: david? >> let's go back to basics. this is a race republicans should have won. they thought they were going to win it. they thought they'd take back the senate. i thi
to washington, people compromised. now it's a dirty word? when did that happen? >> well, you know, it's a good question. it happened, unfortunately, story rapidly, and somehow people think compromising is capitulating on your principles. far from it. you have to talk with people whom you disagree. i thought how best i contribute my 34 years of experience and voice on the outside so that we don't return to this kind of dysfunction ever again, especially at this moment in time for our history. but the essence of public service is solving problems, and we've lost that central purpose. and we have to return to it. and hopefully, we have some starters here with the fiscal cliff decisions, that we can have confidence-building measures in the final analysis. because there's a sense of urgency. so hopefully the concillation of words will turn into urgency of action. >> schieffer: are you optimistic at all about them find something way to get past this fiscal cliff? >> um, i think they will. you know, i think on the short term they have to. because every thing will ratchet up the risk to the economy. w
. and i'm old enough to remember when you were a lawyer here in washington, and one of my best friends was your law partner in that old law firm. how did you get into this? i mean, what-- >> i had been writing since i was a kid. i was trying to sell short stories to the "new yorker" when i was 14 and realized if i changed my name to j.d. salinger my odds would be considerably improved. i spent 10 years writing short stories, that's what i really love to do. and i liked to read short stories in high school and college but i had no success doing that. i had a family early on, and it was something i kept doing. i went into screen play writing for a while and got an agent in hollywood which is almost impossible because most agents in hollywood i met don't know there is a state called virginia. they don't think anything exists owz of california. and i started writing my first novel "absolute power," and that kind of changed my life. i thought it would be the novel that would get the attention of an agent, and it was the big break i needed. >> schieffer: that later became a movie. >> it did
this morning, just like another washington shopper this weekend. >> we're going to get those. >> okay. >> schieffer: because this is "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> schieffer: and good morning again. well, just hours after helping negotiate the cease-fire between the israelis and hamas, egyptian president mohamed morsi declared more power for himself and said he was immune to judicial oversight. that has set off violent protests between morsi's muslim brotherhood, and the opposition parties. police used terd gas in cairo yesterday. more than 500 have been injured and egypt's judicial branch is joining with the opposition in protest. both sides have announced plans for major protests in cairo on tuesday. cbs news correspondent holly williams is in cairo this morning. holly, what can you tell synonymous. >> reporter: well, bob, what we're seeing here today in central cairo is violent clashes. they're fighting running street battles in the area around tahrir square, so the protesters throw stones and som
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)